My current list of publications
 
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(with some links to their publishers’ websites and some reviews)

 

 
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BOOKS

Authored and co-authored


 

The True Israel: uses of the names Jew, Hebrew and Israel in Ancient Jewish and Early Christian Literature.

published by E.J. Brill, 1996.  

In the series Arbeiten zur geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums.

Reprinted in paperback Nov. 2001  

Synopsis  
What do the names Jew, Hebrew, and Israel mean in the vernacular? That is, how did writers from 300 BCE to 200 CE use these names? What were they influenced by? And how did readers interpret them? Judaism was and continues to be culturally diverse, and writers sought to be clear and therefore “politically correct” even then. This book takes into account written as well as oral works that circulated during this 500-year period. Taking neither an etymological nor an archaeological approach, The True Israel instead applies the theory of associative fields to explore the full range of associations of the names in their actual context to better understand how the words were actually used. Divided into three parts, concerned with the names ‘Jew’, ‘Hebrew’, and ‘Israel’ respectively, the volume argues a case about ancient polemics about the nature of Israel (the people). Within each section, individual chapters are dedicated to specific literature (including Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls, the writings of Josephus, Philo and the first Christians). This book makes a significant contribution to Jewish self-definition, then and now.

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Listening People, Speaking Earth: Contemporary Paganism.

Published simultaneously by Hurst & Co. (London); and : Wakefield Press (Adelaide), 1997.  

Also published by New York University Press under the title Contemporary Paganism: Listening People, Speaking Earth.

Reprinted in 2000.

The second edition (2007) is now available (in / from the UK at least)

Italian translation: Credenti della nuova èra: I pagani contemporanei, Rome: Editore Feltrinelli, 2000

Synopsis
A broad-based introduction to the main trends of contemporary Paganism, discussing Druidry, Witchcraft, Heathenry, Goddess Spirituality, Magic, Shamanism, Geomancy, Environmentalism, Thealogy (or is it Theoilogy?), Ethics, and more. Making use of both traditional history and the movement’s more imaginative sources, the book reveals how Paganism and its central focus on the celebration of nature is evolving and how this new religion perceives and relates to more traditional ones.

Synopsis of Italian translation:
L’autore scandaglia gli aspetti politici e i rituali del movimento pagano contemporaneo, che dedica attenzione a tutto ciò che mette in pericolo la vita nelle sue varie manifestazioni (il cibo, gli alberi, la salute, il lavoro, il tempo libero).

Review
“Graham Harvey has written the best book yet published upon an important complex of contemporary religions, of which most people know only through hearsay and sensational journalism. His account is exciting, revealing, objective and just; the whole kaleidoscope of Paganism is here in all its vivid colours: witches, Druids, Odinists, eco-mystics and many others.”
--Ronald Hutton, University of Bristol

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Animism: Respecting the Living World.

published simultaneously by C.Hurst & Co. (London); Columbia University Press (New York); and Wakefield Press (Adelaide), 2005.

See Animism.org.uk for more information about this book and for ever expanding discussion of the issues it raises and the communities, worldviews and lifeways it discusses. The website is also new and in need of a lot of work, so keep visiting!

Reviews:
“The strengths of this book are its fluid and engaging ... writing; its openly committed stand on the central question, i.e., whether or not animals, plants, rivers, etc. are people, and its use of major ethnographic sources as evidence, together with conversations with indigenous peoples.”
—Stewart Guthrie, Fordham University

“Harvey’s insightful and balanced study challenges both earlier studies of animism and more recent critics who argue that scholars should throw out the term altogether. This is a fascinating and passionate study of lifeworlds in which things are ‘very much alive’ and in which relation to non-human others is considered central.”
—Sarah M. Pike, California State University, Chico, author of Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves: Contemporary Pagans and the Search for Community.

 

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See the companion website
for this book

The cover of Animism: Respecting the Living World uses the excellent painting, “Kunka Women’s Dreaming’ by Gladys Yawentyne — with the permission of the artist and of Ngurratjuta Art Centre, Alice Springs, Australia.

 
 

Historical Dictionary of Shamanism

co-authored with Robert Wallis

published by The Scarecrow Press (Lanham, USA).

Cover blurb:

Few religious traditions have generated such diversity and stirred imaginations as shamanism. In their engagements with other worlds, shamans have conversed with animals and ancestors and have been empowered with the knowledge to heal patients, advise hunters, and curse enemies. Still other shamans, aided by rhythmic music or powerful plant helpers, undertake journeys into different realities where their actions negotiate harmony between human and other than human communities. Once relegated to paintings on cave walls, today Shamanism can be seen in performances at rave clubs and psychotherapeutic clinics.

The Historical Dictionary of Shamanism has the duel task of exploring the common ground of shamanic traditions and evaluating the diversity of both traditional indigenous communities and individual Western seekers. This is done in an introduction, a bibliography, a chronology, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries, which explore the consistent features of a variety of shamans, the purposes shamanism serves, the function and activities of the shaman, and the cultural contexts in which they make sense.


 

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cover picture of (and c/o) Runic John

 
 

What do Pagans believe?

published by Granta in their "What do we believe?" series

Cover blurb:

Paganism is among the fastest growing religions in the world. It is most commonly expressed in the celebration of seasonal festivals such as the solstices, and through the use of magic: attempts to make changes in the world or in individual consciousness.

Among the different ways of being Pagan are Druidry, Goddess Spirituality, Heathenry, Wicca, and a host of ‘ethnic Paganisms’. The Pagan paths all share common ground in celebrating human belonging in nature.

Drawing on ancient sources, Paganism engages with some of the chief concerns of this age including ecology and feminism. While in some contexts celebrating nature can be romantic, it has also led many Pagans to get involved in radical action. Paganism stresses personal choice while acting in harmony with the widest possible community of life.

 

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BOOKS
Edited / co-edited

 

Words Remembered, Texts Renewed: Festschrift for Prof. John F.A. Sawyer.

Co-edited with Jon Davies and Wilfred Watson;

published by Sheffield Academic Press, 1995.

Synopsis
To mark the retirement of John F. A. Sawyer, Professor of Religious Studies in the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, colleagues and former students from around the world have contributed studies on his areas of interest: the study of Hebrew, the books of the Jewish Bible, and the culture and traditions of Judaism. The essayists consider not simply the origin of the meaning of word and text, but also the many ways in which word and text become transposed, re-oriented and often enough traduced by later interests and purposes. They engage with the broadest issues of the relationship between sacred texts and private and public lives. The roll call of scholars reads: Philip Alexander, Francis Andersen, Graeme Auld, Calvin Carmichael, Robert Carroll, David Clines, Richard Coggins, Jon Davies, Philip Davies, James Dunn, John Elwolde, John Gibson, Graham Harvey, Peter Hayman, Dermot Killingley, Jonathan Magonet, Robert Morgan, Takamitsu Muraoka, Christopher Rowland, Deborah Sawyer, Clyde Curry Smith, Max Sussman, William Telford, Marc Vervenne, Wilfred Watson, Keith Whitelam and Isabel Wollaston.

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Paganism Today: Ancient Earth Traditions for the 21st Century.

Co-edited with Charlotte Hardman;

Published by London: Thorsons, 1996.

Reprinted as Pagan Pathways: a Guide to the Ancient Earth Traditions, 2000

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Indigenous Religions: A Companion.

published by Continuum (London and New York), 2000.

Synopsis:
Indigenous religions are the majority of the world’s religions. This Companion shows how much they can contribute to a richer understanding of human identity, action, and relationships. An international team of contributors discuss representative indigenous religions from all continents. The book is in three parts - Persons, Powers, and Gifts

Review:
“Wide-ranging… The editor ... provides an innovative introduction, framing the essays that follow theoretically and challenging the readers’ presuppositions. The essays are relatively accessible to the non-specialist and would make a useful introductory text for an undergraduate course on religions not often covered in standard ‘world religions’ textbooks.”
--Religious Studies Review

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Law and Religion in Contemporary Society: Communities, Individualism and the State.

Co-edited with Peter Edge;

published by Ashgate (Aldershot), 2000.

Synopsis
The relationship between law and religion has traditionally been analysed according to two basic paradigms. One has focused on the relationship between religious communities and the State (the Church/ State paradigm), while the other has concentrated on the relationship between the State and the individual (the liberal-individualist or civil liberties paradigm). This book enriches the analysis of law and religion in society by emphasising a third and complementary analytical dimension involving the relationship between religious communities and religious individuals. In particular, the contributors explore the various facets of the multiple tensions that exist in the legal relationships between religious organisations, State and adherents in the period leading up to the third Christian millennium.

Against the background of the complex and sometimes contradictory responses of religious organisations and the State to the Human Rights Act, this interdisciplinary collection draws on contributions from leading scholars active in the field of religious rights and the interaction of law and religion based in the UK, USA, Canada, New Zealand and elsewhere, and makes a timely and significant contribution to international debates in a variety of academic disciplines. Contributors explore international concerns over religious liberty, focusing particularly on the boundaries of ethnicity and religious community, the status of the ‘established’ Churches in the UK, and the proper place for religious organisations under generally applicable legal regimes of non-discrimination. Themes discussed are closely related to wider interests within legal and socio-legal studies involving gender, discrimination, equality, community and the nature and limits of individualism and individual legal rights

Reviews
‘The content of the book is excellent with all the authors delivering interesting and informative discourses in their specific areas ... a very valuable addition to the lamentably small amount of work in this increasingly important area of study.‘
- Journal of Contemporary Religion.

‘...this is a very useful book that contains some timely contributions to the emerging debates about religion, law, and human rights...this volume is welcomed as a very relevant contribution to the field.‘
- Culture and Religion

‘... of interest to scholars of comparative law and judicial politics, including those searching for case studies of the interaction of law and pluralism or the role of the international human rights movement in the legal politics within individual nation-states.‘
- The Law and Politics Book Review

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Indigenous Religious Musics.

co-edited with Karen Ralls;

published by Ashgate (Aldershot), 2001.

includes a CD with recordings of some of the musics discussed.

Synopsis
Celebrating the diversity of indigenous nations, cultures and religions, the essays which comprise this volume discuss the musics performed by a wide variety of peoples as an integral part of their cultural traditions. These include examinations of the various styles of Maori, Inuit and Australian Aboriginal musics, and the role of music in Korean Shaman rituals.

Indeed, music forms a key component of many such rituals and worldviews, and examples of these are explored amongst the peoples of Uganda, Amazonia and Africa. Through analysis of these rituals and the part music plays in them, the essays also open up further themes including social groupings and gender divisions, and engage with issues and debates on how we define and approach the study of indigeneity, religiosity and music.

With a complimentary CD featuring some of the music discussed in the book and further information on other available recordings, this is a book which gives readers the opportunity to gain a richer experience of the lived realities of indigenous religious musics

Reviews
‘This book marks a welcome and innovative addition to a growing list of publications on indigenous religions ...’
-Journal of Contemporary Religion

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Readings in Indigenous Religions.

published by Continuum, 2002.

Synopsis:
Readings in Indigenous Religions brings together classic and recent writings concerned with contemporary indigenous religions. These significant and important works contribute both to expert discussion of important religious and cultural issues and also to on-going debates about improved methods of research. The inclusion of examples of indigenous ideological, legal and fiction writing further enhances the volume’s engagement with indigenous and scholarly perspectives, experiences and interests. Readings is divided into four Parts: Ontology, Performance, Knowledge and Land. Editorial introductions make explicit the links, common themes and further ramifications of the seventeen chapters. The four chapters in ‘Ontology’ argue that relationships are definitive in the formation and maintenance of identities, and that the notion of ‘the supernatural’ is misleading. ‘Performance’ contains five chapters that discuss various rituals and their participants, including healing, world-making, magic and shamanising. Six chapters in ‘Knowledge’ demonstrate the critical importance of attending to indigenous modes of discourse about knowledges. Finally, ‘Land’ contains two chapters that exemplify the richness of indigenous relationships and engagements with, and knowledges of, particular places. In addition to expert descriptions of aspects of particular indigenous religious lifeways and worldviews, the readings also encourage a reconsideration of academic approaches to the study of indigenous religions. The realisation that researchers and writers are engaged in relationships with indigenous hosts proffers a challenge to academic methodologies that assert objectivity and distance. New dialogical and conversational methods of engagement promise to reconnect academia in building more equitable relationships and a healthier world.

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Shamanism: A Reader.

published by Routledge, 2003.

Synopsis:
Shamanism has been practised amongst communities all over the world for millennia, and continues to survive and sometimes thrive today in both modern and traditional forms. Shamanism: A Reader unites perspectives from disciplines including anthropology, psychology, musicology, and botany to provide an unique overview of recent and contemporary writing on shamanism. Juxtaposing the traditional practices of indigenous peoples with their new and often radically urban reinterpretations, experts including Michael Harner, Milhály Hoppál, Marjorie M Balzer and Piers Vitebsky raise questions about constructions of shamanism, its efficacy, its use and misuse as a cultural symbol, and its various natures.
Locating its material in the encounter between traditional and contemporary, and within many forms of response to the image of the shaman, Shamanism: A Reader is an essential tribute to the vitality and breadth of shamanic tradition both among its original practitioners of Europe, the Americas and Asia, and within seemingly familiar aspects of the modern west. Representing the best of classic and current scholarship, and highlighting the diversity of approaches to shamanism in an accessible and user-friendly way, this clearly introduced and organized collection sets a new standard for shamanic study in terms of the breadth and depth of its coverage.

Reviews:
‘Graham Harvey’s compilation stands out ... for the ambition and range of his vision ... it is a mark of the care and respect with which Harvey approaches his material that he recognises the existence of no fewer than five different phenomena with the category broadly labelled shamanism ...’
- Ronald Hutton, Times Higher Education Supplement

‘A very interesting anthology of shamanic and neo-shamanic thought ... for anyone wanting to understand shamanism form a wider point of view ... it is an excellent and enjoyable read.’
- Sacred Hoop

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The Paganism Reader.

Co-edited with Chas S. Clifton;

published by Routledge, 2004

Synopsis:
Paganism is one of the worlds fastest-growing religions, practised in a huge variety of ways. The Paganism Reader provides a definitive collection of key sources in Paganism, ranging from its ancient origins to its twentieth-century reconstruction and revival. Chronologically organized sections include extracts from ancient Greek, Norse and Celtic literature, inspirational texts from the early twentieth-century, writings by leaders of the Pagan revival, and newer perspectives showing the diversity of Paganism today. Witchcraft, nature religion, shamanism and goddess worship are considered, as is the influence of environmental and feminist movements. Fully introduced, with editors prefaces to all extracts and suggestions for further reading, this comprehensive book is an invaluable guide to Paganism and critical issues in its study.

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Researching Paganisms.

Co-edited with Jenny Blain and Doug Ezzy;

published by Altamira (New York), 2004.

Synopsis
Should researchers of spirituality and religion be distantly “objective,” or engaged and active participants? The traditional paradigm of ‘methodological agnosticism’ is increasingly challenged as researchers emphasize the benefits of direct participation for understanding beliefs and practices. Should academic researchers “go native,” participating as “insiders” in engagements with the “supernatural,” experiencing altered states of of consciousness? How do academics negotiate the fluid boundaries between worlds and meanings which may change their own beliefs? Should their own experiences be part of academic reports? Researching Paganisms presents reflective and engaging accounts of issues in the academic study of religion confronted by anthropologists, psychologists, sociologists, historians and religious studies scholars—as researchers and as humans—as they study contemporary Pagan religions. The insights that contributors gain, with resultant changes to their own lives, will fascinate not only other scholars of Pagan religions, but scholars of any religion and indeed anyone who grapples with issues of reflexive research.

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Indigenous Diasporas and Dislocations.

Co-edited with Charles Thompson;

published by Ashgate, 2005.

Synopsis:
Indigenous religions are now present not only in their places of origin but globally. They are significant parts of the pluralism and diversity of the contemporary world, especially when their performance enriches and/or challenges host populations. Indigenous Diasporas and Dislocations engages with examples of communities with different experiences, expectations and evaluations of diaspora life. It contributes significantly to debates about indigenous cultures and religions, and to understandings of identity and alterity in late or post-modernity. This book promises to enrich understanding of indigeneity, and of the globalized world in which indigenous people play diverse roles.

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Ritual and Religious Belief: a Reader.

published by Equinox (London) and Routledge (New York), 2005.

In the series: Critical Categories in the Study of Religion

Synopsis:
Rituals are among the most obvious and common religious activities, but their relationship with other aspects of religion, especially ‘belief’, has been a problem both for religious people and for scholars. In many religions leaders have worried that people are ‘just going through the motions’, doing without understanding. People are often accused of ‘vain repetition’ as if it were possible to perform significant religious acts without repeating oneself. Even the word ‘performance’ is difficult, because it might imply pretence rather than sincerity. Yet it is not at all clear that religious actions, rituals, are meant to be understood. They may even appear contrary to rational and thoughtful statements of what a religion teaches.

This Reader brings together material that illustrates the problem of ritual as a type of religious behaviour, in relation to belief and thought, and as ‘vain repetition.’ The material presented here seeks an understanding of ritual as performances that may have a logic different to ‘belief’ or as actions that are not meant to be understood. The contributors discuss recent questions about the fluid performance of all identities and the inherent permeability of critical categories such as ritual. An introduction to the various debates is also provided.

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EDITORSHIPS – series, special issues of journals and encyclopedia panels
 

 

Vitality of Indigenous Religions.

Ashgate Monograph Series.

Co-editors: Lawrence Martin, Chair of American Indian Studies Program, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, USA, and Tabona Shoko, University of Zimbabwe.

Series commenced in 1999.

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For info about the series, including details on offering a manuscript, click here

For info about existing books
in the series, click here

 
 

Religion, Culture and Society.

Ashgate. A focused cluster of high profile titles exploring the critical issues of contemporary society and culture, and relationships to and within living religions.

Co-editors: Peter Edge, Reader in Law, Oxford Brookes University, and Lois Lorentzen, University of San Francisco

Series commenced in 1999.

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For info about the series, including details on offering a manuscript, click here

For info about existing books
in the series, click here

 
 

Member of editorial panel of Ecotheology

Becoming Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture in January 2007.

published by Equinox.

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Member of editorial panel of The Pomegranate: The Journal of Pagan Studies

published by Equinox.

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Member of editorial panel of Australian Religious Studies Review

published by Equinox.

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Joint Guest Editor with Marion Bowman, issue of Diskus, “Pagan Identities”, 2000.

http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb03/religionswissenschaft/journal/diskus/#6

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Guest Editor issue of Ecotheology 8.1 ‘Nature Constructing Societies’, 2003.

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Associate Editor with particular responsibilities for Paganisms entries, and task force member for European ‘Religions, Nature and Culture’ entries, Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature (general editor: Bron Taylor, University of Florida), London / New York: Continuum, 2005

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OCCASIONAL PAPERS
 

Religious Experience in Contemporary Society, Religious Experience Research Centre Occasional Paper 14 (2nd Series). Oxford: RERC, 1997.

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CHAPTERS IN BOOKS

some edited by me, some by other people

 

‘Death and Remembrance in Modern Paganism’, in Ritual and Remembrance: Responses to Death in Human Societies (ed.: Davies, J.; Sheffield Academic Press, 1994) 103-22.

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‘The Suffering of Witches and Children: Uses of the Witchcraft Passages in the Bible’, in Words Remembered, Texts Renewed: Festschrift for Prof. John F.A. Sawyer, (eds: Davies, J., Harvey, G., Watson, W.G.E.; Sheffield Academic Press, 1995) 113-134.

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‘Ritual Abuse Allegations, Incitement to Religious Hatred: Pagans and Christians in Court’, in New Religions and the New Europe (ed.: Towler, R.; Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 1995) 154-170.

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‘Heathenism: a North European Pagan tradition’, in Paganism Today (eds: Harvey, G., Hardman, C.; London: Thorsons, 1996) 49-64.

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‘Handfastings, Funerals and other Druid Rites of Passage’ in Philip Carr-Gomm (ed.) The Druid Renaissance. London: Thorsons, 1996. pp. 202-17.

Revised and republished as The Rebirth of Druidry, London : Element, 2003. pp. 208-23.

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and now
 
 

‘Paganism and the Environment’, Faiths and the Environment: Conference Papers. Faith in Dialogue 1 (1996) (Centre for Inter-Faith Dialogue, Middlesex University) 71-85.

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‘Synagogues of the Hebrews: “Good Jews” in the Diaspora’ in Jewish Local Patriotism and Self-Identification in the Graeco-Roman Period (eds: Siân Jones and Sarah Pearce; JSPss 31; Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1998): 132-47.

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‘Coming Home and Coming Out Pagan but not Converting’ in Religious Conversion: Contemporary Practices and Controversies (Issues in Contemporary Religion; eds: Christopher Lamb and Darrol Bryant; London: Cassell, 1999): 233-46.

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‘Introduction’ and ‘Art Works in Aotearoa’ in Indigenous Religions: a Companion (ed.: Graham Harvey; London / New York: Cassell, 2000). pp.1-19, 155-72.

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‘Boggarts and Books: towards an appreciation of Pagan Spirituality’ in Beyond New Age: Exploring Alternative Spirituality (eds: Steven Sutcliffe and Marion Bowman; Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000). pp.155-68.

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‘Comments on “The Permeability of Boundaries debate: alternative archaeology — has it happened?”’ in R.J. Wallis and K. Lymer (eds) A Permeability of Boundaries? New Approaches to the Archaeology of Art, Religion and Folklore, Oxford, BAR International Series 936; 2001. pp. 121-3.

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‘Pagan Studies or the Study of Paganisms? A case study in the study of religions’ in Jenny Blain,  Doug Ezzy and Graham Harvey (eds). Researching Paganisms. New York: Altamira, 2004. pp.241-55.

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‘Performing identity and entertaining guests: Maori diaspora in London’ in Graham Harvey and Charlie Thompson, Indigenous Diasporas and Dislocation. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005. pp.121-34.

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‘Performing and Constructing Research as Guesthood’ in Lynne Hume and Jane Mulcock (eds), Anthropologists in the Field. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005. pp.168-82.

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‘Finding your Path in Kristin Madden and friends (co-authors), Exploring the Pagan Path, Franklin Lakes: New Page, 2005. pp. 43-55.

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‘Foreword’ in Ly de Angeles, Emma Restall Orr and Thom van Dooren (eds). Pagan Visions for a Sustainable Future. Woodbury: Llewellyn, 2005. pp. xi-xv.

 

Click here for the book’s website - including my foreword.

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Becoming Pagan having been Christian’ in Christopher Partridge and Helen Reid (eds), Finding and Losing Faith: Studies in Conversion,  Paternoster Press ‘Studies in Religion and Culture’ series. pp. 56-69.

 

 

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  ‘Discworld and Otherworld: The popularisation of Pagan fantasy literature’, in Lynne Hume and Kathleen McPhillips (eds), Popular Spiritualities: The Politics of Contemporary Enchantment, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005.

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‘Huldah’s Scroll: a pagan Reading’ in Lisa Isherwood (ed.), Patriarchs, Prophets and Other Villains, London: Equinox, 2006.

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Harvey, G. (2007) ‘Inventing Paganism’ in James Lewis and Olav Hammer (eds) The Invention of Sacred Traditions. Cambridge University Press. pp. 277-90. ISBN 9780521864794

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Forthcoming Chapters in Books

 
 

 

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‘Satanism: performing alterity and othering’ in James Lewis and Jesper A. Petersen (eds) Contemporary Religious Satanism, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005.

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ARTICLES in refereed Journals

 
 

‘Current Research on Paganism and Witchcraft in Britain’, co-authored with Susan Greenwood, Amy Simes and Malory Nye, Journal of Contemporary Religion 10 (1995): 185-92.

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‘Satanism in Britain Today’, Journal of Contemporary Religion 10 (1995) 283-96.

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‘The Authority of Intimacy in Paganism and Goddess Spirituality’, Diskus 4.1 (1996) 34-48.

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’Shamanism in Britain Today’, On Ritual (ed. Günter Berghaus; London: Routledge, 1998) Performance Research 3.3: 15-23.

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‘Sacred Places in the Construction of Indigenous Environmentalism’, Ecotheology 7.1 (2002) 60-73.

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‘Guesthood as ethical decolonising research method’, Numen 50.2 (2003): 125-46.

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‘Environmentalism in the construction of indigeneity’, Ecotheology 8.2 (2003) 206-23.

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‘Endo-cannibalism in the making of a recent British Ancestor’, Mortality 9.3 (2004): 255-67.

Click here for Ingenta's copy of the abstract

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‘Animals, Animists and Academics’, Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 41.1 (2006): 9-19.

Click here for the papers abstract
and here for the link to Blackwell's page from where you may be able to download it

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ARTICLES in Journals

 
 

‘Bastille Day, the Bible and Mrs. Thatcher’, New Blackfriars 70 (1989) 552-4.

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‘Avalon from the Mists: the contemporary teaching of Goddess Spirituality’, Religion Today 8.2 (1993) 10-13.

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‘Gods and Hedgehogs in the Greenwood: the Cosmology of Contemporary Paganism’, in Mapping Invisible Worlds, Cosmos 9 (ed.: Gavin Flood; Edinburgh University Press, 1993) 89-94.

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‘The Roots of Pagan Ecology’, Religion Today, 9.3 (1994) 38-41.

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‘Jewish-Christians: Jesus and now’, Theology 98 (1995) 461-66.

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‘Mary Douglas’ Purity and Danger’, Turning Point, in BASR Bulletin No. 96 (2002) 31-2.

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‘Satanism: performing alterity and othering’, in Syzygy: Journal of Alternative Religion and Culture (Special Issue on Satanism, guest edited by Jesper A. Petersen) 11 (2002): 53-68.

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‘Animism: Pagan Ecology, Ethics and Etiquette’, in ‘Scholars Speak’, Circle Magazine: Nature Spirituality Quarterly 85 (2002): 24-6.

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ARTICLES on-line

 
 

‘Fantasy in the Study of Religions: Paganism as observed and enhanced by Terry Pratchett’ in Graham Harvey and Marion Bowman (eds), Pagan Identities, special issue of Diskus, 6, 2000.

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‘Maori diaspora spirituality, global indigeneity and the construction of academia’ at http://www.cesnur.org/2001/london2001/harvey.htm

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‘Satanismo: realidades e acusações’ (‘Satanism: realities and accusations’), Revita de Estudos da Religião No. 3, 2002. (on-line journal at http://www.pucsp.br/rever) (In Portuguese).

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Articles in Encyclopedia

 
 

‘Maori Religion’ in World Religions, London: Times Books, 2002. pp. 70-3.

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‘Druidry’, ‘Heathenism’ and ‘Covenant of the Goddess’ in Chris Partridge (ed.), Encyclopedia of New Religions, Lion, 2004.

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‘Indigenous Religions’ in Chris Partridge (ed.), The World’s Religions, Lion, 2005.

Co-published by Fortress Press as World Religions.

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‘Paganism’ in Microsoft’s Encarta 2006.

and ‘Animism’ in Encarta 2007.

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